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Mantras

What is a Mantra

A mantra is a sequence of words or syllables that are chanted, usually repetitively, as part of Buddhist practice. An example of a mantra is om mani padme hum, which is associated with Tibetan Buddhism.

The function of a mantra is understood differently by the several schools of Buddhism, but at its most basic level, the chanting of a mantra is thought to evoke enlightenment. Sometimes mantras are used as a form of meditation

Mantras for you to listen


Om_Mani_Padme_Hum

Avalokitesvara Mantra

Om Mani Padme Hum

Tibetan Buddhists believe that saying the mantra (prayer), Om Mani Padme Hum out loud or silently to oneself, invokes the powerful benevolent attention and blessings of Chenrezig, the embodiment of compassion. Viewing the written form of the mantra is said to have the same effect. It is often carved into stones, and placed where people can see them.

Om Mani Padme Hum song


Shakyamuni mantra

Shakyamuni Mantra

Oṃ muni muni mahāmuni śākyamuni svāhā Om muni muni mahamuni shakyamuni svaha 

Shakyamuni (the sage of the Shakyan clan) is the historical Buddha, also known as Siddhartha Gautama.

Shakyamuni was almost certainly the first enlightened figure to be visualized. There’s a beautiful passage in the Sutta Nipata (an early Buddhist text) where Pingiyatalks about how he is never separated from the Buddha. He says that at any time he wishes he can see and hear his teacher, even though he lives hundreds of miles from where the Buddha dwells.

Shakyamuni’s mantra is a play on his name. Muni means sage. Mahameans great. So the mantra reads “Om wise one, wise one, greatly wise one, wise one of the Shakyans, Hail!” Also this mantra is commonly found in the following form:

Om muni muni mahamuni shakyamuniye svaha

This form has the name of Shakyamuni in the dative form, so that it reads “Om wise one, wise one, great wise one, to the wise one of the Shakyanshail!”

This is actually the more common form of the mantra in Sanskrit, although in Tibetan the mantra is in the “Tibeticized” version of the shorter form given above: Om muni muni maha muni shakyamuni soha – “soha” being the Tibetan rendering of “svaha.”

Buddha Shakyamuni Mantra


Amitabha mantra

Amitabha Mantra

Oṃ Amideva Hrīḥ. 

To overcome all obstacles & hindrances 

This is the sacred mantra of BUDDHA AMITABHA which protects you from dangers and obstacles, and overcomes all hindrances to your success. The mantra enhances your compassionate and loving nature bringing incredible blessings each time you recite the mantra

OM AMI DEWA HRIH

Recite the mantra 108 times a day to ensure rebirth in Amitabha’s pure land.

Amitabha Mantra


WhiteTaraMantraCircle

White Tara Mantra

Oṃ Tāre Tuttāre Ture Mama Ayuḥ Punya Jñānā Puṣtiṃ Kuru Svāhā

White Tara (Sitatara) is associated with long life. Her mantra is often chanted with a particular person in mind. She’s another representation of compassion, and she’s pictured as being endowed with seven eyes (look at the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, and her forehead) to symbolize the watchfulness of the compassionate mind.

White Tara Mantra


graan tara

Green Tara Mantra

OM TARE TUTTARE TURE SOHA

Tara mantra is often used to overcome physical, mental or emotional blockages and also blockages in relationships. Green Tara is very active and steps down to help all the beings. Only thing required is that we need to resign and let go of our clinging to a particular outcome, because, to cling to a particular outcome is often self-defeating, as it creates unhappiness and agitation, particularly when it involves other people. The more we have Tara’s non-grasping attitude the more happy we are. When chanting the Tara mantra, we need to let go and bring the energy back into ourselves. This will generate immense inner peace and clarity.

Green Tara Mantra


medicinebuddha

Medicine Buddha Mantra

short form: 

Tayata Om Bekanze Bekanze Maha BeKanze Radza Samudgate Soha 

The Medicine Buddha mantra is recited for success. Since we have many problems and want to succeed we need to recite the Medicine Buddha mantra every day. It can help us eliminate the problems, unhappiness and suffering we don’t want and gain the success, happiness, inner growth and realizations of the path that we do.

Lord Buddha told his attendant Ananda that even animals who hear the Medicine Buddha mantra will never be reborn in the lower realms. The highly attained Kyabje Chöden Rinpoche, who has completed the entire path to enlightenment, said recently that if you recite the Medicine Buddha mantra at the time of death you will be reborn in the pure land. Therefore, it is to be recited not only for healing but also to benefit people and animals all the time, whether they’re living or dying.

medicine buddha mantra


ManManjushri

Manjushri Mantra

Om A Ra Pa Ca Na Dhih

This mantra is believed to enhance wisdom and improve one’s skills in debating, memory, writing, and other literary abilities. “Dhīḥ” is the seed syllable of the mantra and is chanted with greater emphasis and also repeated a number of times as a Decrescendo.

Manjushri mantra


vajrapani mantra

Vajrapani mantra

Om Vajrapani Hum

Vajrapani doesn’t, to many newcomers to Buddhism, look very Buddhist at all. He is a Bodhisattva who represents the energy of the enlightened mind, and his mantra also symbolizes that quality.

Vajrapani is pictured dancing wildly within a halo of flames, which represent transformation.

He holds a vajra (thunderbolt) in his right hand, which emphasizes the power to cut through the darkness of delusion. Vajrapani looks wrathful, but as a representation of the enlightened mind, he’s completely free from hatred.

vajrapani

Vajrapani’s mantra is simply his name, which means “wielder of the thunderbolt”, framed between the mystical syllables Om and Hūm. This mantra helps us to gain access to the irrepressible energy that Vajrapani symbolizes. A familiarity with Vajrapani does, of course, help here, although the sound of the mantra is itself rather energetic.

Vajrapani mantra


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